Continuum
Education

Search Results

108 result(s) found for 1.0-1.5
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 4: IAQ in Practice - Building Materials and Finishes
The course “IAQ in Practice – Building Materials and Finishes” is the fourth of six courses in the course series, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This course is designed for architects to consider how the selection of building materials and finishes can either positively or negatively affect the indoor air quality within a building. By leveraging third party resources discussed within this course, making informed design decisions, and creating specific language within construction documents, architects can play a major role in improving indoor air quality both during construction as well as when spaces are occupied.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.8586698
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 6: IAQ in Practice - Building Case Studies
The course “IAQ in Practice - Building Case Studies” is the final of six courses in the learning program, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This course is designed to educate architects on the most important and practical key points identified within the series by demonstrating, through a variety of case studies, the lessons taught throughout the first five courses. The course includes a review of fundamental indoor air quality concepts and their importance for human health and safety, examples to show how design can affect indoor air quality, the practical application of key concepts, and more.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.7607079
Getting to Yes: Making Effective Use of the Alternate Means Process
The building code is a tool used by designers and authorities with the objective of protecting the public and emergency personnel. It is the duty of the designer and building official to ensure that the intent of the code is satisfied. Although the prescriptive language of the code is intended to protect public health and safety for most projects, every building, site, and design is unique. This course explores the provisions for alternate materials and methods requests (AMMRs) in section 104.11 of the International Building Code® (IBC®) and how they may be used to achieve code compliance.
Format: CE Course Pages: 64 Score: 3.7607079
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 3: IAQ in Practice - Building Systems and Activities
The course “IAQ in Practice – Building Systems and Activities” is the third of six courses in the learning program, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This course is designed to educate architects on the different ways in which air contaminants can be introduced and how they can be addressed in a building. Building systems and activities are discussed in detail as this course dives deeper into how building enclosure systems in particular can be designed to improve indoor air quality (IAQ). This course also describes how to qualify and quantify the effectiveness of systems to control contaminants as well as daily practices for maintaining healthy indoor air.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.7607079
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 2: Building Design
The course “IAQ & Building Design” is the second of six courses in the learning program, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This course is designed to educate architects on the importance of indoor air quality (IAQ) for human health and safety, and to explain why IAQ is monitored during building operations. This course recognizes the building design considerations that impact IAQ and outlines the steps an architect can take to promote healthful IAQ by reducing, removing, and diluting contaminants.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.7607079
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 5: IAQ in Practice - Building Moisture
The course “IAQ in Practice - Building Moisture” is the fifth of six courses in the learning program, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This course is designed to educate architects on the benefits and risks of building-related moisture as it pertains to indoor air quality. The key factors in successful moisture management include understanding that you cannot prevent all moisture from penetrating a building, designing to minimize moisture penetration, and providing opportunities for drainage and drying.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.7607079
Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness, Course 1: Indoor Air Quality Overview
The course “Indoor Air Quality Overview” is the first of six courses in the learning program, “Indoor Air Quality for Architects: Design Buildings to Promote Health and Wellness.” This introductory course is designed to educate architects on fundamental indoor air quality (IAQ) concepts, including the relationship between IAQ and indoor environmental quality (IEQ), health impacts related to IAQ, common contaminants, and how contaminants may be measured. This course defines the architect’s role and the role of the broader building design, construction, and management team in promoting acceptable IAQ, and includes references and resources that architects may find useful when evaluating designs for IAQ considerations.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.7607079
Building Envelopes Part 7: Building Envelope Case Studies
This course is one of a series of eight mini-monographs on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This seventh course analyzes two case study buildings to document actual operational performance results of improved building envelope design strategies. Each mini-monograph of this eight-part series can be taken as an individual course. 
Format: CE Course Pages: 118 Score: 3.6725552
Subsurface Conditions Part 1: Basic Concerns, Design Information, & Division of Responsibilities
Soil and subsurface water conditions affect the design and performance of building projects. Therefore, knowledge about subsurface conditions is critical. This course discusses design tasks related to subgrade conditions, coordination of design professionals and division of responsibility, and the determination of what information is required and how to obtain it. This course is part of a four-part series that examines soil mechanics as it relates to building construction and performance. Each part can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 84 Score: 3.6725552
Building Envelopes Part 2: Design Perception and Construction Methods/Systems
This course is one of a series of eight CE courses on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This second course explores the design perception of the building envelope and identifies the characteristics of different construction methods and systems.  Each part of this CE series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 125 Score: 3.6725552
Building Envelopes Part 1: History and Types
This course is one of a series of eight CE courses on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This first course explores the development of the building envelope throughout time and defines the different properties and functions of building envelope types. Each part of this CE series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 109 Score: 3.6725552
Building Envelopes Part 5: Advanced Energy Strategies
This course is one of a series of eight CE courses on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This fifth course investigates advanced technologies that can maximize a building envelope’s energy performance and describes new alternative energy strategies. Each part of this CE series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 102 Score: 3.6725552
Subsurface Conditions Part 4: Site Development Considerations & Management of Site Materials
Soil and subsurface water conditions affect the design and performance of building projects. Therefore, it is important to recognize the problems of working with ground materials for the purposes of building and site construction and general site-surface development. This course discusses site development considerations, the management of site materials, and what can go wrong along the way. This course is part of a four-part series that examines soil mechanics as it relates to building construction and performance. Each part can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 66 Score: 3.6725552
Why Ethics Matter and How to Apply Them in Practice
Ethics provide a method for architects to deal with the dilemmas they often encounter in practice. This course provides a framework for analyzing difficult situations through ethics. It introduces the moral foundations theory, virtue ethics, deontological ethics, social contract ethics, and utilitarian ethics. Using this framework and the AIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, the course examines a number of scenarios.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.6725552
Why Buildings Fail Part 2: Fundamental Errors at the Outset of a Project
The design professional is faced with the tremendous challenge of anticipating, predicting, and mitigating against all possible modes of failure. This course addresses errors that occur at the earliest concept and planning stages of a project, with examples of past failures and discussions of how they could have been avoided. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 62 Score: 3.6725552
Why Buildings Fail Part 4: Material Selection & Detailing Errors During the Design Phase
Failures seldom result from a single error made by an individual; they more often result from a combination of interrelated factors involving both technical and human (procedural) deficiencies. This course presents examples of material selection and detailing errors during the design process and offers guidance on how to avoid them. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 49 Score: 3.6725552
Designing to Model Nature: Applying the Concepts of Biomimicry
As design professionals seek more creative and effective solutions to new challenges that arise as the world continues to change and evolve, biomimicry can be the source of inspiration to inform and expand the design process. This course provides an introduction to the concepts and principles of biomimicry in order to use the information to solve design problems such as sustainability issues. Specific examples are included of how nature was the inspiration used to solve challenges over time and how those ideas have influenced the present approach to biomimicry in the design process. Questions are provided to stimulate discussion within a project team and help organize a practical and effective way to communicate and incorporate biomimicry into a project. Building product and project examples offer design inspiration, a way of thinking applied to a project, and lessons learned from the process.
Format: CE Course Pages: 71 Score: 3.6725552
Subsurface Conditions Part 2: Soil Properties, Behaviors, Classification, & Identification
Soil and subsurface water conditions affect the design and performance of building projects. Therefore, the general nature of soils—including their structural properties—must be understood by any designer involved in site or subgrade construction. This course discusses soil properties and behaviors as well as soil classification and identification systems. This course is part of a four-part series that examines soil mechanics as it relates to building construction and performance. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 74 Score: 3.6725552
Subsurface Conditions Part 3: Foundations & General Site Development
Soil and subsurface water conditions affect the design and performance of building projects. Therefore, knowledge about subsurface conditions is critical. This course discusses types of foundations and their suitable applications as well as development of the overall building site. This course is part of a four-part series that examines soil mechanics as it relates to building construction and performance. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 77 Score: 3.6725552
Fire Safety in Buildings Part IV: Managing the Exposed
This is the fourth course in a series of five courses on fire safety in buildings. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This part investigates one aspect of the fire safety concepts tree: managing the exposed.
Format: CE Course Pages: 111 Score: 3.6725552
Effective Termite Protection for Multifamily & Commercial Wood Buildings: Techniques for Keeping Wood-Frame Buildings Pest-Free
Worldwide, there are more than 2,000 termite species, and forty-five can be found in the US. The key to effective termite prevention is making the building inhospitable to termites. This course focuses on how to design and construct wood-frame buildings for termite prevention and how to keep buildings insect-free over the long term. Intended for developers and design/construction teams, it covers building code requirements, best practices, control methods, costs, and ongoing maintenance. It emphasizes subterranean termites (including Formosans) and briefly covers drywood termites and other insects with the potential to cause damage.
Format: CE Course Pages: 64 Score: 3.6725552
The Architect’s Seal: An Ethical and Legal Obligation
Some of the most common disciplinary actions against architects consist of those related to the use of the architect’s seal. In these case studies, we review the legal requirements and ethical considerations related to the use of the architect’s seal, responsible control, the boundaries between architecture and other disciplines, and interstate practice.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.6725552
Security Planning and Design Part 7: Security and Emergency Operations
This course looks at both security and emergency preparedness in building operations so that design professionals can better anticipate the implications of design decisions on these aspects of building use. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 60 Score: 3.6725552
Security Planning and Design Part 4: Building Hardening
This course explains concepts for making buildings more resistant to the effects of ballistic attacks, forced entry, and explosions. Blast mitigation structural design methods, tools, and techniques are covered, as well as issues concerning the selection of hardened building materials and components. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 79 Score: 3.6725552
Building Envelopes Part 8: Responsive Building Envelopes
This course is one of a series of eight mini-monographs on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This eighth course investigates responsive and dynamic technologies that allow the building envelope to react to changing environmental conditions. Each mini-monograph of this eight-part series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 116 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Part III: Major Trends & Their Implications for the Future
The idea that every completed building is an experiment with potential surprises can now be replaced with the knowledge that architects can create facilities that will deliver the quality expected of them by relying on building performance evaluations (BPEs) as the basis for programming and design. This benefits the public’s health, safety, and welfare as architects continue to improve the buildings that they design. This mini-monograph presents an overview of the limits of current post-occupancy evaluation (POE) methodology along with the benefits of and suggestions for improving BPEs. The course concludes with a discussion of the future implications of such critical evaluations. This is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of POEs and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 130 Score: 3.6725552
Security Planning and Design Part 3: Security Planning and Evaluation
This part of the series highlights the assessment process used to define security needs. Methods are described for analyzing assets, threats, and vulnerabilities and for defining acceptable risk levels from which functional security design requirements and design strategies can be developed. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each part can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 87 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Case Studies Part 4: Courthouse POE Toolkit Pilot Study
Compared to indicative and investigative postoccupancy evaluations (POEs), diagnostic POEs tend to provide more comprehensive and in-depth evaluations, especially for large-scale projects. These types of POEs, however, typically require a high level of effort since they make use of multiple data collection methodologies and processes. Through the use of a case study analysis, this course reviews the diagnostic POE process, with particular emphasis on the tools and techniques used in the data collection and analysis process. In addition, a review of the evaluators’ suggestions for items to be addressed, along with their potential solutions, is presented. This course is the last of the four-part Improving Building Performance Case Studies series. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 77 Score: 3.6725552
Fire Safety in Buildings Part V: Conclusion and Case Study
This is the fifth course in a series of five courses on fire safety in buildings. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This part sums up the fire safety design for buildings and provides a case illustrating these points.
Format: CE Course Pages: 90 Score: 3.6725552
Client Pressure and the Duty of the Architect
This course is intended to prepare the architect to recognize and respond appropriately to ethical dilemmas encountered at work, especially when engaging with forceful clients or clients with differing values. The three scenarios presented here will help the architect successfully recognize potential ethical challenges and build effective strategies to meet their duty to the client and the public.
Format: CE Course Pages: 50 Score: 3.6725552
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part IV: Noise Control: Sound Isolation Principles & Airborne Measures
Airborne sound transmission between rooms or from outside of a building is often perceived as unwanted noise. The principles of sound isolation are introduced here, with a focus on techniques to reduce flanking noise and achieve higher acoustical privacy. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 55 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Part V: Investigative Post-Occupancy Evaluation Case Study
By relying on building performance evaluations as the basis for programming and design, architects can create facilities that will deliver the quality expected of them. This benefits the public’s health, safety, and welfare as architects continue to improve the buildings that they design. This mini-monograph presents a case study of an elementary school post-occupancy evaluation conducted at the investigative level. This course is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of post-occupancy evaluations and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 132 Score: 3.6725552
Fire Safety in Buildings Part I: Fire Behavior and Fire Department Operations
This course is the first of a series of five courses on fire safety in buildings. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This part will explain the fire triangle, transference of heat, fire development in an enclosed space, and its impact on building behavior.
Format: CE Course Pages: 110 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Case Studies Part 3: Deer Park Junior/Senior High School Career Academy
While investigative postoccupancy evaluations (POEs) tend to require more planning and resource allocation than indicative POEs, they often provide a more detailed and comprehensive approach to evaluating building performance. This course presents a case study analysis of an existing building using the investigative POE approach. The process for evaluating and designing the building’s facilities is reviewed, and how the new facilities function for their intended use is examined. In addition, the POE’s specific findings and lessons learned about the building’s design are discussed. This course is the third of the four-part Improving Building Performance Case Studies series. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 72 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Case Studies Part 1: The Alfred Newton Richards Medical Laboratory Building
While postoccupancy evaluations (POEs) can be used to measure the overall performance of a building in relation to its intended use, other building performance evaluation (BPE) methods can also be used over the lifetime of a building. This course presents a case study analysis of an existing building using a combination of several BPE methods, not limiting investigative analysis to only that of postoccupancy. The case study also outlines how performance evaluation and feedback relate to client goals, historic preservation, local building code, and environmental requirements. This course is the first of the four-part Improving Building Performance Case Studies series. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 66 Score: 3.6725552
Fire Safety in Buildings Part III: Managing the Fire
This is the third course in a series of five courses on fire safety in buildings. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This part investigates one aspect of the fire safety concepts tree: managing the fire.
Format: CE Course Pages: 119 Score: 3.6725552
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part V: Noise Control: Background Noise & Door and Window Sound Isolation
A century’s worth of research into the effects of noise has found that long‐term exposure to loud sounds contributes to hearing loss; those who sleep in noisier environments are more prone to heart disease; and subjects suffer cognitively when assigned to tasks that involve careful listening in noisy environments. This course discusses design considerations, materials, and methods to improve noise control in buildings. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 68 Score: 3.6725552
Improving Building Performance Case Studies Part 2: New Mexico K‒12 Public School Districts
Although cursory in nature, an indicative postoccupancy evaluation (POE) provides an indication of the major failures and successes in a building’s performance and points to issues that deserve further, more in-depth investigation. Through the use of a case study analysis, this course reviews the indicative POE process, evaluation criteria, and lessons learned in the use of an indicative POE. Also reviewed are the key strategies used to reveal the administrative and architectural changes necessary to improve an evolving system using an indicative POE. This course is the second of the four-part Improving Building Performance Case Studies series. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 72 Score: 3.6725552
Fire Safety in Buildings Part II: Preventing Ignition
This is the second course in a series of five courses on fire safety in buildings. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This part describes the fire safety concepts tree and zeros in on one branch: preventing ignition.
Format: CE Course Pages: 109 Score: 3.6725552
Security Planning and Design Part 6: Biochemical and Radiological Building Protection
This course presents concepts and technologies for protecting people in buildings from the effects of chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) contamination, including response strategies for HVAC and potable water systems. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 81 Score: 3.6725552
Accommodating Shrinkage in Multistory Wood-Frame Structures
In wood-frame buildings of three or more stories, cumulative shrinkage can be significant and have an impact on the function and performance of finishes, openings, mechanical/electrical/plumbing (MEP) systems, and structural connections. However, many have learned that accommodating wood shrinkage is actually very straightforward. This course describes procedures for estimating wood shrinkage and provides detailing options that minimize its effects on building performance.
Format: CE Course Pages: 79 Score: 3.6725552
Wind Forces Part 5: Wind Pressure Analysis, Strengthening Buildings, & Practical Considerations
For existing buildings that are found to have wind resistance deficiencies, there is often no easy way of correcting the deficiencies without damaging finishes. For new buildings, however, achieving acceptable wind resistance is a relatively simple task, since needed structural elements, strength requirements, and connection details can be incorporated during the design process. Using the envelope procedure specified in ASCE 7-16, this course reviews the wind pressure analysis for an example building type. In addition, the methods that can be used to strengthen buildings for wind resistance are discussed, as well as some practical considerations for wind-resistant buildings. This is the fifth in a series of five courses on wind forces. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2022 edition is a substantial update of the original Wind Forces course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 95 Score: 3.5928085
Professional Conduct Part 5: Conflicts of Interest
This course provides an overview of the Model Rules of Conduct pertaining to conflicts of interest, with actual and hypothetical cases illustrating the issues of compensation and disclosure, as well as a discussion of how to best understand the concept of a conflict of interest. This course is part of a five-part series that reviews and discusses the standards all architects are legally obliged to follow. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 47 Score: 3.5928085
Predesign Planning Part 4: Publications and Records
This course covers the techniques and tools used to gather information from publications and records to identify the values and needs pertinent to the building design. It discusses the different kinds of information needed for precommission, predesign planning, and design. It describes search procedures to find and techniques to record, review, and summarize the information in a value-based matrix. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge and skills in information search and review. Each course of this ten-part series can be taken individually. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 106 Score: 3.5928085
Wind Forces Part 3: Concepts & Descriptive Examples of Building Design for Wind
Buildings can be considered an assembly of parts or components. These parts may be major structural elements or seemingly nonstructural elements that contribute to the enclosure of space. This course focuses on building structure and how it may be designed to resist pressures. Through the use of examples, a review is presented of the structural systems of two buildings, the possible construction types, and details to be considered when the design process focuses on the effects of wind. This is the third in a series of five courses on wind forces. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2022 edition is a substantial update of the original Wind Forces course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 88 Score: 3.5928085
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part I: Basic Theory & Sound Absorption
Better building acoustics makes better buildings; architectural acoustics needn’t be a mystery. This course introduces the basic theory of sound with discussions on sound level, propagation, and frequency, followed by an overview of sound absorption materials and calculations. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 89 Score: 3.5928085
Seismic Mitigation Part 4: Design for Better Seismic Response
While the traditional approach to seismic mitigation focused on strengthening building resistance, in recent times more advanced techniques have tended to focus on reducing the level of earthquake-related stress placed on buildings. Through the use of building case examples, this course explores how architects can design for better seismic mitigation. Also presented is a review of a number of common design options available to improve seismic response, including bracing, moment-resisting frames, and pierced shear walls. This is the fourth of a series of six courses that focuses on seismic mitigation. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2021 edition is a substantial update of the original Seismic course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 101 Score: 3.5928085
Security Planning and Design Part 1: Security in the Built Environment
This course explores contextual issues for security at regional, community, and local levels. Emerging issues facing design professionals are discussed, including existing versus new building design, security and aesthetics, and designing for security in an open society. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 77 Score: 3.5928085
Seismic Mitigation Part 6: Managing Design and Construction, and Design Resources
The design of complex objects involving many people and functions requires careful management if progress is to be made toward a successful conclusion. This course examines the role of design management in seismic performance. Particular attention is paid to the use of construction observation and performance-based design as approaches that can be used to design structures with predictable and defined seismic performance goals. Also reviewed are a variety of design resources that can be used by architects when designing for seismic mitigation. This is the last in a series of six courses on seismic mitigation. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2021 edition is a substantial update of the original Seismic course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 129 Score: 3.5928085
Planning for Sustainable Development Part 2: Case Studies
To effectively plan for and implement sustainable development requires a clear understanding of the organizing principles for meeting human development goals while sustaining the natural systems and resources of the environment. In Part I of this two-part series, an introduction to the principles and concepts of sustainable development and an overview of respected programs, initiatives, and resources to guide current projects are provided. The interrelationships between and integration of issues to plan for and resolve using the sustainable development process are presented with an emphasis on various models for effectiveness. Approaches to engaging and educating the development team and community on the value of sustainable development are also presented. In Part II, examples and case studies demonstrate how different sustainable development programs and strategies have been implemented in projects, and their rationale and effectiveness is discussed based on initial goals and outcomes.
Format: CE Course Pages: 70 Score: 3.5928085
Architecture to Calm the Unseen Trauma of Combat Veterans
The way in which combat veterans perceive their postdeployment environment is impacted by their training and military experiences. In this course, we explore common environmental perceptions among veterans that reflect the unseen trauma these soldiers carry with them. These perceptions are used to analyze and determine architectural solutions that help calm the unseen trauma of America’s combat veterans.
Format: CE Course Pages: 53 Score: 3.4541428
Right to the City: Equity, Sustainability, and Single-Family Zoning, Part 2
Growing US cities face escalating housing costs, residential and commercial displacement, homelessness, and the suburbanization of poverty. As increasing numbers of households are pushed out of the city by rising housing costs, they are burdened with long commutes and increased transportation costs while their carbon emissions escalate. These challenges are exacerbated by a deeply embedded policy—single-family zoning—that accounts for 75% or more of the land area allotted for housing in many fast-growing US cities. Part 2 of this two-part series outlines policies implemented at the city and state levels to make existing single-family neighborhoods more inclusive, equitable, walkable, and sustainable. It illustrates innovative case studies at the building scale to increase access to these neighborhoods for both renters and homeowners. In addition, it reviews efforts by architects and AIA chapters to address this issue despite the controversy that surrounds it. Each part of Right to the City can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 75 Score: 3.4541428
Seismic Mitigation Part 3: Design for Better Seismic Response
The forensic investigation of buildings and infrastructure has been extensively conducted by engineers, architects, and scientists after every recent major earthquake that has impacted the built environment. This course focuses on how architects can use the analysis and documentation of the effects of seismic movements to design for better seismic response. Included is a discussion of a general design approach for improved seismic response and a review of various design improvements using building design cases. This is the third course in a series of six courses on seismic mitigation. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2021 edition is a substantial update of the original Seismic course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 127 Score: 2
Living, Regenerative, and Adaptive Building Design Strategies
Living, regenerative, and adaptive design incorporates interrelated, innovative concepts that challenge traditional building paradigms and even standards for sustainable design. It is possible to create living, regenerative, and adaptive buildings by considering them as dynamic and interactive structures. Their design utilizes inventive approaches and technologies that seek to integrate and restore the natural environment rather than just addressing the building design itself. This course provides an introduction to the concepts and principles of living, regenerative, and adaptive design and helps the learner differentiate between them. The course also offers strategies to consider incorporating into a project, including creating buildings that generate their own energy, recycle their own water, improve the environment and the quality of life for occupants, and adapt to changing weather or conditions. Examples demonstrate how these strategies have been effectively implemented in projects. Case studies offer inspiration and lessons learned from the process.
Format: CE Course Pages: 93 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 2: Integrated Design
The integrated design process is a key strategy in designing and constructing buildings that are healthier for occupants, have a lower impact on the environment, and protect public welfare. This course provides an introduction to the principles and application of integrated design to projects in order to achieve high performance. You will gain an understanding of how integrated design differs from traditional design and how important the role of the integrated design team is in the process. Case study examples demonstrate a wide range of approaches and outcomes using the integrated design process to address the goals of various types of projects. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 89 Score: 2
Wind Forces Part 1: The Nature of Wind & Its Implications for Buildings
While advances in technology have led to expanded code requirements and greater client expectations for building performance, the unexpectedly high pressures associated with wind forces often result in extensive building failures. This course introduces the learner to the fundamental concepts and vocabulary associated with wind forces. The technical aspects of wind forces are also reviewed, with particular emphasis on how buildings behave when subjected to wind and the structural aspects of building behavior. This is the first in a series of five courses on wind forces. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2022 edition is a substantial update of the original Wind Forces course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 106 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 3: Performance Metrics (Part A)
The primary purpose of “Performance Metrics for Sustainable Design” is to explore what building designers can do to reduce the impacts of building construction and operation on the environment. This CE course discusses specific metrics to evaluate the individual facets of design. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was reviewed in 2023 and no changes were made
Format: CE Course Pages: 107 Score: 2
Historic Preservation Part 5: Modern Heritage, Social Justice, Equity, & Inclusion
The past several decades have seen discussions of why preserving modern heritage is different from traditional heritage and how addressing systemic racial and social injustices is key to telling the full American story. “Modern Heritage, Social Justice, Equity, & Inclusion” examines 21st century preservation and addresses the complexities that modern heritage, intangible heritage, and social justice have added to preservation. This course is the last of the five-part Historic Preservation series. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 130 Score: 2
Why Buildings Fail Part 5: Errors During the Construction Phase
Failure is an always present possibility, especially when the potential for failure is not fully considered by design professionals. When there are substantial structural design flaws, a failure is quite likely during the construction phase, for this is the first physical test of the adequacy of the design. This course addresses the types of failures that can occur during construction, with examples of past failures and guidance on avoiding them. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 100 Score: 2
Professional Conduct Part 1: Registration
This course provides an overview of registration rules for architects, with a discussion of the meaning of the practice of architecture and the design professional. The requirement for state-by-state registration, the reason for registration, and penalties for failing to do so are also addressed. This course is part of a five-part series that reviews and discusses the standards all architects are legally obliged to follow. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 100 Score: 2
Security Planning and Design Part 2: Understanding Threats, Hazards, and Security Design Concepts
Part 2 of this series examines threats driving the need for security planning and design in buildings. It focuses on criminal and terrorist threats with respect to their nature, how they are carried out, and how their effectiveness can be reduced. It describes the basic components of security, presents a framework to help designers think about security in a comprehensive way, and identifies approaches for incorporating security concepts, strategies, and measures into the design process. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 95 Score: 2
Why Buildings Fail Part 1: Forces & Destructive Agents
Even the most successful individuals keep in mind that failure is a possibility. To properly anticipate failure, the architect must be aware of the many potential sources of errors. Presented here are explanations of how environmental and human-caused forces and agents can cause building failure, along with design and construction recommendations to prevent such failures. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 118 Score: 2
Seismic Mitigation Part 5: Improving on Existing Construction & Mitigation of Seismic Forces
Ongoing research and experience from recent seismic events have added to the store of knowledge that allows architects to address problems in the design of new buildings. However, it is also essential to address problems in existing buildings that will behave predictably in a major seismic event. This course examines the factors that must be considered when retrofitting existing buildings. In addition, the course reviews seismic design strategies that can be used for mitigating earthquake forces on building structures. Particular attention is paid to the use of base isolation, damping systems, and aseismic design as tools for seismic mitigation. This course is the fifth in a series of six courses on seismic mitigation. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2021 edition is a substantial update of the original Seismic course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 127 Score: 2
Why Buildings Fail Part 6: Operational Errors; Failure Avoidance & Dispute Resolution
The study of failures equips the competent design professional with increased knowledge that leads to more successful achievements. If designs are to be successful over time, all sources of failure must be considered, including the potential for misuse, neglect, and other operational errors. This course presents examples of operational errors that led to failure and offers guidance on how to avoid them. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 95 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 1: Green Building Standards and Certification Systems
This course provides an introduction to green building standards and certification systems in use around the world with an emphasis on differentiating between single-attribute and multiattribute programs. Following green building standards and certification system guidelines leads to buildings that are healthier for their occupants, have a lower impact on the environment, and protect public welfare. The development, benefits, and application of the certification and rating systems are also discussed in order to effectively select and apply the appropriate ones to a project. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 126 Score: 2
Historic Preservation Part 4: Economics & Sustainability
The primary purpose of “Economics and Sustainability” is to examine preservation in the 21st century as it becomes more relevant and mainstream. This course presents examples of how to fund preservation work and addresses the complexities and considerations for doing such work in an environmentally sustainable manner. This course is the fourth of the five-part Historic Preservation series. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 135 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 4: Performance Metrics (Part B)
The primary purpose of “Performance Metrics for Sustainable Design” is to explore what building designers can do to reduce the impacts of building construction and operation on the environment. This CE course discusses specific metrics to evaluate the individual facets of design. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2020.
Format: CE Course Pages: 107 Score: 2
Adaptive Reuse: An Environmentally and Socially Beneficial Alternative to New Construction
Adaptive reuse is becoming increasingly common because it not only preserves important historical features of existing buildings but is also inherently sustainable. This course addresses the social well-being fostered by preserving and revitalizing the existing urban fabric, understanding the intent of and complying with regulatory challenges unique to adaptive reuse, and supporting sustainability through reuse and systems upgrades while improving accessibility to existing buildings. In addition, guidelines are presented to assist in navigating the process of engaging adaptive reuse projects. Case studies are woven throughout the course to illustrate strategies and ideas that are generalizable to successfully repurposing many different types of buildings.
Format: CE Course Pages: 102 Score: 2
Why Buildings Fail Part 3: Engineering Errors During the Design Phase
Architects face countless challenges in the performance of their work, including the obligation to anticipate all reasonably predictable sources of failure and to provide a design that successfully lessens the likelihood of any kind of failure. This course presents examples of structural engineering errors during the design process and offers guidance on how to avoid them. This course is one of a six-part series that investigates the sources of building failure. Each part can be taken as an individual course. In 2022, this material was reviewed and updated to remain timely but was not extensively rewritten.
Format: CE Course Pages: 81 Score: 2
Mold and Moisture Prevention Part 1: Key Issues Related to Mold and Moisture Intrusion
An alarming number of new buildings suffer from moisture and mold problems, which are a risk to occupants’ health, safety, and welfare. The debate rages on as to why some buildings fail and others do not, who is responsible for these failures, and how to fix them. This course looks at the key causes of mold and moisture intrusion, with discussions of important climate considerations and design and construction procedures to prevent future problems. This course is part of a four-part series that discusses how to improve building performance related to mold and moisture issues. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 107 Score: 2
Wind Forces Part 4: Improving Building Wind Resistance & Stabilization
While architects cannot alter unexpectedly high wind pressures, building connection details and their strength can be considered within the architect’s scope and control. This course reviews the methods that can be used to improve building resistance against overturning, uplift, and sliding. Also reviewed are the use of horizontal and vertical wind collectors to distribute surface pressures and mechanical dampers to decrease lateral movement caused by wind pressures. Using the directional procedure specified in the ASCE 7-16 standard, the course also presents a wind pressure analysis for an example building type. This is the fourth in a series of five courses on wind forces. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2022 edition is a substantial update of the original Wind Forces course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 116 Score: 2
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part III: Room Acoustics
The study of architectural acoustics is itself an act of architecture. This course addresses the priorities necessary to design good rooms for listening, including considerations to avoid acoustic defects and design checklists for unamplified music halls as well as other room types where good acoustics are essential. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 73 Score: 2
Barrier-Free Design and the 2010 ADA Standards
The reader of this course receives a quick refresher on the history of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the current 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design, as well as the approach for the design professional to use in meeting the requirements of the 2010 Standards in any given project. Discussions and case studies clarify the use of the 2010 Standards and highlight common mistakes found in their application in new construction and renovation. Finally, the course highlights elements of design that are now part of the 2010 Standards but were not addressed by earlier Standards. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 90 Score: 2
Wind Forces Part 2: Wind Effects & Procedures for Wind-Resistant Design in Practice
While wind pressure typically develops on the surfaces of any obstruction placed in the path of the flow, the distribution of pressure on any surface of the obstruction varies, and the variation depends on the size, shape, and proportion of the obstruction. This course reviews the relationship between stream flow and pressure development, with particular emphasis on the nature and distribution of pressures developed on building surfaces. Also reviewed are pressure coefficients, the effects of internal and external pressures on buildings, and some general considerations of standard procedures for wind force analysis. This is the second in a series of five courses on wind forces. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2022 edition is a substantial update of the original Wind Forces course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 116 Score: 2
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part VI: Noise Control: Impact Noise & Community Noise
Impact noise transmitted directly to the building structure is particularly annoying to building occupants, and unless it is accounted for in the initial design, is difficult to correct. Excessive community noise is common, a source of great annoyance, and a danger to human health, ranking as the greatest single source of dissatisfaction related to where people live. This course addresses the best design methods to mitigate both impact and community noise. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 78 Score: 2
Security Planning and Design Part 8: Putting Security into Practice
This course provides practical advice about security considerations in both the business operations and project delivery aspects of architecture practice. Hypothetical design examples are presented to demonstrate the application of security strategies and measures to selected building functions. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 133 Score: 2
Professional Conduct Part 3: Accountability
This course provides an overview of the Model Rules of Conduct as applicable to accountability, with actual and hypothetical cases illustrating the importance of the designer having detailed knowledge of the content of the plans during their preparation as a means of exerting accountability in the practice of architecture. This course is part of a five-part series that reviews and discusses the standards all architects are legally obliged to follow. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 59 Score: 2
Practice Management: Strategies for Enhancing Public Welfare and Service Delivery
This course focuses on practice management from the perspective of supporting both public welfare and client interests through enhanced service delivery. The emphasis on public welfare is critically important because architects, as professionals and service providers, must prefer client interests over their own, and when the issues are clear, they must prefer public interests over both. This suggests that, if circumstances warrant, architects must raise client values to align them with public values. Indeed, the AIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct implores members to “promote and serve the public interest.” So how can architects and their practices best operationalize professional obligations to clients and the public? They can engage in the following strategies that are discussed in the course: Provide public interest professional services. Share practice knowledge and experience with colleagues and the public. Conduct practice-based research. Investigate emerging technologies. Cultivate firm culture that supports learning and innovation and includes justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) initiatives. Collaborate effectively to facilitate client and stakeholder relations.
Format: CE Course Pages: 105 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 9: Site and Climate
One of a series of ten courses about the reasons to conduct and methods to accomplish effective predesign planning in architecture, this course shows how to use the value-seeking and information-gathering methods described in the previous courses to conduct a comprehensive analysis of site and climate for a project. It discusses site and climate considerations and techniques and tools used in site and climate analysis. It includes case studies of two projects in very different site and climate situations to demonstrate how site and climate impact architectural design. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge and skills in site and climate analysis and how to incorporate them into a predesign plan. Each course of this ten-part series can be taken individually. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 156 Score: 2
Professional Conduct Part 4: Honesty
This course provides an overview of the Model Rules of Conduct pertaining to honesty, with actual and hypothetical cases illustrating the issues related to corruption and bribery in the practice of architecture. Also included is a discussion of the difficulties in applying the rule forbidding the wanton disregard of the rights of others. This course is part of a five-part series that reviews and discusses the standards all architects are legally obliged to follow. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 102 Score: 2
Mold and Moisture Prevention Part 3: Design Development
During design development, building systems that can help avoid mold problems are selected, construction moisture control guidelines for the builder are provided, and operational requirements to minimize mildew potential are determined. The important architectural and mechanical design decisions that are required during this phase are addressed here, with the intention of protecting public health, safety, and welfare. This course is part of a four-part series that discusses how to improve building performance related to mold and moisture issues. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 125 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 2: Values and Architecture
One of a series of ten courses about the reasons to conduct and methods to accomplish effective predesign planning in architecture, this course discusses the importance of discovering strongly held values as a beginning point for predesign planning. It shows how the three enduring values of architecture first expressed by the Roman architect Vitruvius are relevant for today’s architecture. It also shows how many other values impact contemporary architecture and discusses in detail eight value areas under the acronym HECTTEAS (TEST EACH). The course demonstrates at length how these values become issues that architects must address in design. Three case studies show how values uncovered in three very different predesign plans influenced the resulting architecture. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge about value-based predesign planning. Each part of this ten-part series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 173 Score: 2
Preventing Suicide Falls: A Primer for Architects
The structures architects design and bring to life offer joy to clients, building occupants, and the public. However, for a small number of people, these structures become a place to end their pain. This course is a primer for architects in preventing suicide falls. By the end of this presentation, we hope you will have a better understanding of how architects can play a role in preventing suicide.
Format: CE Course Pages: 100 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 5: Diagnostic Interviews
This is the second of five courses focusing on methods used in predesign planning. Like the doctor trying to make a medical diagnosis by talking with the patient, the predesign planner makes an architectural diagnosis by interviewing stakeholders in a project. A successful diagnostic interview identifies the primary values and goals of the client(s), staff, and users of a proposed facility. This course covers the techniques and tools required to conduct successful diagnostic interviews. It shows how to plan and conduct these interviews both in person and online. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge and skills about diagnostic interviewing. Each course of this ten-part series can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 115 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 1
One of a series of ten courses about the reasons to conduct and methods to accomplish effective predesign planning in architecture, this course discusses the various approaches to predesign planning used over the years. It includes various terms and definitions for predesign planning and covers in detail client-based, design-based, knowledge-based, and consensus-based predesign planning. It advocates for value-based predesign planning, beginning with a deep search for the important values relating to a project. It then utilizes the best aspects of the other approaches to predesign planning to produce predesign plans. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge about value-based predesign planning. Each part of this ten-part series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 112 Score: 2
Mold and Moisture Prevention Part 4: Final Design, Construction, Postconstruction, and Assessment
The importance of decisions that can help prevent future mold and moisture problems extends through all stages of building design and construction. This course addresses the considerations necessary in the final design, construction, postconstruction startup, and system commissioning phases. Ensuring that steps are taken toward mitigating mold and moisture during these final phases will help protect public health, safety, and welfare. This course is part of a four-part series that discusses how to improve building performance related to mold and moisture issues. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 122 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 7: Questionnaires and Surveys
This is the fourth of five courses focusing on methods used in predesign planning. This course covers the techniques and tools required to develop useful questionnaires and conduct successful surveys. It discusses the relationship with other methods, when to use a questionnaire, and the importance of planning. It covers the steps to prepare a questionnaire and discusses the logical order of questions. It covers question types, sampling, bias, data analysis, cost of error, and how to conduct a survey. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge and skills in developing questionnaires and conducting surveys. Each course of this ten-part series can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 144 Score: 2
Mold and Moisture Prevention Part 2: Schematic Design
The schematic design phase is generally considered to include approximately 30 percent of the project design and offers the best opportunity to prevent future moisture and mold problems. This course addresses the architectural and mechanical considerations for making the critical design decisions during this phase. Mitigating moisture and mold problems will protect the public health, safety, and welfare in our buildings. This course is part of a four-part series that discusses how to improve building performance related to mold and moisture issues. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 110 Score: 2
Security Planning and Design Part 5: Building Security Techniques
This course profiles available security equipment and systems for surveillance, detection, and access control functions in buildings. Issues such as functionality, operation, spatial requirements, aesthetic implications, and cost are addressed, along with other design and selection considerations. This course is part of an eight-part series that covers concepts, principles, and processes for incorporating enhanced security into the design of new and existing buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 96 Score: 2
Building Envelopes Part 3: Material Selection
This course is one of a series of eight CE courses on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This third course analyzes the building envelope performance specifications for several building materials, considering performance, cost, aesthetics, and environmental impact. Each part of this CE series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 146 Score: 2
Improving Building Performance Part II: Planning, Conducting, & Applying the POE
Post-occupancy evaluation (POE) examines the performance of a building in a comprehensive manner, addressing health, safety, security, and functionality, as well as social, psychological, and cultural appropriateness. POEs contribute to protect the public’s health, safety, and welfare as a continuous improvement tool for the built environment. This mini-monograph describes the steps and considerations required in the three phases of POE: planning, conducting, and applying. This course is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of post-occupancy evaluations and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 193 Score: 2
Improving Building Performance Part I: Building Performance and Post Occupancy
Post-occupancy evaluation (POE) examines the performance of a building in a comprehensive manner and can help architects understand and correct problems on recently completed projects and make better decisions in future projects. POEs contribute to protect the public’s health, safety, and welfare as a continuous improvement tool for the built environment. This mini-monograph introduces POE with a discussion on the history and benefits of POEs, as well as how the performance concept is used in conducting POEs. The three levels at which a POE may be undertaken are also addressed. This course is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of post-occupancy evaluations and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 174 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 6: Diagnostic Observation
One of a series of ten courses about the reasons to conduct and methods to accomplish effective predesign planning in architecture, this is the third of five courses focusing on methods used in predesign planning. This course covers the techniques and tools required to conduct successful diagnostic observations of people, places, objects, and their interactions to uncover how the environment influences human behavior. The differences with diagnostic interviewing are covered and the need to develop understanding, not just description, is emphasized. Several types of observation and observation formats, including photographic documentation, are included. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge and skills in diagnostic observation. Each part of this ten-part series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 100 Score: 2
Predesign Planning Part 3: Project Planning
This course is one of a series of ten courses about the reasons to conduct and methods to accomplish effective predesign planning in architecture to identify client goals, user and community needs, and codes and regulations. The various phases of architectural projects are described and the information the predesign planner must develop for project feasibility, site suitability, master planning, and predesign planning are discussed. The course focuses on predesign planning for schematic design, design development, and construction drawings. It stresses the importance of discovering the values that become critical issues for each phase of predesign planning. A case study shows how predesign planning impacts the various phases of project planning. Exercises and references allow the reader to develop knowledge about and skills in project planning. Each course of this ten-part series can be taken individually. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 114 Score: 2
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part VII: Noise Control: Mechanical System Noise
If there were one rule that would net the greatest acoustical yield in the built environment, it might well be, “Maintain ample separation between machines and occupied spaces.” Not only mechanical noise, but plumbing noise, as well, can create a high degree of annoyance to occupants. This course provides design guidance to minimize mechanical and plumbing noise; it concludes with examples of built spaces that illustrate effective acoustic design. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 84 Score: 2
Improving Building Performance Part IV: Indicative Post-Occupancy Evaluation Case Study
In a world driven by consumer demand, continuous and systematic feedback and analysis of the performance of facilities is a necessity that yields multiple benefits. A post-occupancy evaluation (POE) is a process that provides this feedback and analysis to help identify problems and make improvements. This benefits the public’s health, safety, and welfare as architects continue to improve the buildings that they design. Presented here is a case study of a medical center POE conducted at the indicative level. This course is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of post-occupancy evaluations and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 139 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 6: Economic Analyses
Sustainable design provides not only improved indoor environmental quality for building occupants and reduced environmental impact on the earth, but also financial benefits to building owners. However, the perception is that doing the right thing for the environment will cost more. This course focuses on the economic principles used to evaluate and deliver a more sustainable building solution. We will review evaluation of capital investments in equipment, system upgrades, and building maintenance and operations that support buildings with a reduced environmental impact. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 112 Score: 2
Historic Preservation Part 3: How to Plan, Design, & Construct the Preservation Project
Whether it is a house museum, a residence, a courthouse, or a church, every building must be safe to enter, use, and exit. It is as important to understand a building’s significance and authenticity as it is to be able to identify the existing materials and conditions of the building envelope, structural system, and mechanical systems. Once these issues, features, and significance are understood, a team can be created who will work with the owner to identify what planning documents are appropriate to meet the needs of the project. The primary purpose of “How to Plan, Design, & Construct the Preservation Project” is to discuss how to develop and plan the design and preservation approach and process for historic buildings. This course is the third of the five-part Historic Preservation series. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 122 Score: 2
Right to the City: Equity, Sustainability, and Single-Family Zoning, Part 1
Growing US cities face escalating housing costs, residential and commercial displacement, homelessness, and the suburbanization of poverty. As increasing numbers of households are pushed out of the city by rising housing costs, they are burdened with long commutes and increased transportation costs while their carbon emissions escalate. These challenges are exacerbated by a deeply embedded policy—single-family zoning—that accounts for 75% or more of the land area allotted for housing in many fast-growing US cities. In this first of a two-part series, the history, evolution, and social equity and environmental impacts of single-family zoning policy in one city, Seattle, serve as an example of conditions in a number of fast-growing cities around the country. It also outlines the aggressive resistance to change and strategies architects can employ to address this. Each part of Right to the City can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 82 Score: 2
Seismic Mitigation Part 1: Earthquakes and Their Effects
Earthquakes can cause immense structural and nonstructural damage to buildings and injury to the occupants of these buildings. This course introduces seismic mitigation with an overview of earthquakes and their effects. This course is the first of a series of six courses that focuses on seismic mitigation. Each part may be taken as an individual course. This 2021 edition is a substantial update of the original Seismic course first published in 2017.
Format: CE Course Pages: 139 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 5: Trends in the Profession, Performance, and Practice
This course provides an introduction to and overview of the advancements, trends, and predictions for the world of sustainable design, relying on studies, reports, and analyses from a variety of trusted sources. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 119 Score: 2
Architectural Acoustics Illustrated Part II: Room Acoustics Qualities
The study of architectural acoustics is a three‐dimensional endeavor. Presented here are the qualities of room acoustics that are essential to understand and address from the earliest stages of design, for optimal speech intelligibility and music listening. This course is part of a seven-part series that translates the quantitative and qualitative content of acoustics into the graphic language of architecture. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 91 Score: 2
Improving Building Performance Part VI: Investigative Post-Occupancy Evaluation & Diagnostic Post-Occupancy Evaluation Case Studies
To help architects understand and correct problems on recently completed projects and make better decisions in future projects, post-occupancy evaluation (POE) examines the performance of a building in a comprehensive manner. This benefits the public’s health, safety, and welfare as architects continue to improve the buildings that they design. Presented here are two POE case studies, one conducted at the investigative level and the other at the diagnostic level. This course is part of a six-part series that explores the growing use of post-occupancy evaluations and their long-term significance in the design process. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 150 Score: 2
Building Envelopes Part 6: Complex Geometry and Fluid Forms
This course is one of a series of eight mini-monographs on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This sixth course investigates computer-generated complex geometry and fluid forms that can be applied to varying degrees to the design of the building envelope. Each mini-monograph of this eight-part series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 132 Score: 2
Understanding the Architect’s Standard of Care
This course addresses those elements that comprise the standard of care and the linkage to liability that an architect faces during a project’s pursuit, negotiation, design, and construction document production and the construction administration process that affects the architect’s standard of care. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 78 Score: 2
Building Envelopes Part 4: Envelope Performance
This course is one of a series of eight CE courses on building envelopes that offers a critical framework and vocabularies for architectural technology, with a special emphasis on the design and construction of the building envelope. The goal of this series is to develop a means by which designers can create and innovate building envelopes and energy-efficient buildings. These means shall include both an understanding of the forms and components of a building that provide efficiency and comfort, and processes for use in design that will encourage the selection of the proper physical responses and facilitate the investigation of the likely performance of these selections. This fourth course investigates the building envelope as a critical zone that must be properly designed and detailed to address the multiple and complex tasks it is required to perform while mitigating environmental performance problems. Each part of this CE series can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 153 Score: 2
AXP Supervisor Training
Work experience under supervision is a requirement for architectural licensure throughout the United States. This course explains NCARB’s requirements for supervision in the Architectural Experience Program®, as well as practical and ethical considerations for supervisors and mentors. The course explains learning science related to professional training, how to give useful feedback, how to utilize the AXP to provide structured experience, and considerations of unconscious biases which may affect licensure candidates in their professional development. Case study examples help learners to better understand how to apply the concepts described. Anyone who is approving experience or mentoring a licensure candidate will find value in this course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 177 Score: 2
Planning for Sustainable Development Part 1
To effectively plan for and implement sustainable development requires a clear understanding of the organizing principles for meeting human development goals while sustaining the natural systems and resources of the environment. In Part I of this two-part series, an introduction to the principles and concepts of sustainable development and an overview of respected programs, initiatives, and resources to guide current projects are provided. The interrelationships between and integration of issues to plan for and resolve using the sustainable development process are presented with an emphasis on various models for effectiveness. Approaches to engaging and educating the development team and community on the value of sustainable development are also presented. In Part II, examples and case studies demonstrate how different sustainable development programs and strategies have been implemented in projects, and their rationale and effectiveness is discussed based on initial goals and outcomes. Author Information: Stephanie Vierra Publication Date: December 2, 2020 AIA Registration Date: November 29, 2026
Format: CE Course Pages: 109 Score: 2