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15 result(s) found for Sustainability
Historic Preservation Part 4: Economics & Sustainability
The primary purpose of “Economics and Sustainability” is to examine preservation in the 21st century as it becomes more relevant and mainstream. This course presents examples of how to fund preservation work and addresses the complexities and considerations for doing such work in an environmentally sustainable manner. This course is the fourth of the five-part Historic Preservation series. Each section can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 135 Score: 8
Right to the City: Equity, Sustainability, and Single-Family Zoning, Part 1
Growing US cities face escalating housing costs, residential and commercial displacement, homelessness, and the suburbanization of poverty. As increasing numbers of households are pushed out of the city by rising housing costs, they are burdened with long commutes and increased transportation costs while their carbon emissions escalate. These challenges are exacerbated by a deeply embedded policy—single-family zoning—that accounts for 75% or more of the land area allotted for housing in many fast-growing US cities. In this first of a two-part series, the history, evolution, and social equity and environmental impacts of single-family zoning policy in one city, Seattle, serve as an example of conditions in a number of fast-growing cities around the country. It also outlines the aggressive resistance to change and strategies architects can employ to address this. Each part of Right to the City can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 82 Score: 5
Right to the City: Equity, Sustainability, and Single-Family Zoning, Part 2
Growing US cities face escalating housing costs, residential and commercial displacement, homelessness, and the suburbanization of poverty. As increasing numbers of households are pushed out of the city by rising housing costs, they are burdened with long commutes and increased transportation costs while their carbon emissions escalate. These challenges are exacerbated by a deeply embedded policy—single-family zoning—that accounts for 75% or more of the land area allotted for housing in many fast-growing US cities. Part 2 of this two-part series outlines policies implemented at the city and state levels to make existing single-family neighborhoods more inclusive, equitable, walkable, and sustainable. It illustrates innovative case studies at the building scale to increase access to these neighborhoods for both renters and homeowners. In addition, it reviews efforts by architects and AIA chapters to address this issue despite the controversy that surrounds it. Each part of Right to the City can be taken as an individual course.
Format: CE Course Pages: 75 Score: 5
Adaptive Reuse: An Environmentally and Socially Beneficial Alternative to New Construction
Adaptive reuse is becoming increasingly common because it not only preserves important historical features of existing buildings but is also inherently sustainable. This course addresses the social well-being fostered by preserving and revitalizing the existing urban fabric, understanding the intent of and complying with regulatory challenges unique to adaptive reuse, and supporting sustainability through reuse and systems upgrades while improving accessibility to existing buildings. In addition, guidelines are presented to assist in navigating the process of engaging adaptive reuse projects. Case studies are woven throughout the course to illustrate strategies and ideas that are generalizable to successfully repurposing many different types of buildings.
Format: CE Course Pages: 102 Score: 3
Designing to Model Nature: Applying the Concepts of Biomimicry
As design professionals seek more creative and effective solutions to new challenges that arise as the world continues to change and evolve, biomimicry can be the source of inspiration to inform and expand the design process. This course provides an introduction to the concepts and principles of biomimicry in order to use the information to solve design problems such as sustainability issues. Specific examples are included of how nature was the inspiration used to solve challenges over time and how those ideas have influenced the present approach to biomimicry in the design process. Questions are provided to stimulate discussion within a project team and help organize a practical and effective way to communicate and incorporate biomimicry into a project. Building product and project examples offer design inspiration, a way of thinking applied to a project, and lessons learned from the process.
Format: CE Course Pages: 71 Score: 3
Living, Regenerative, and Adaptive Building Design Strategies
Living, regenerative, and adaptive design incorporates interrelated, innovative concepts that challenge traditional building paradigms and even standards for sustainable design. It is possible to create living, regenerative, and adaptive buildings by considering them as dynamic and interactive structures. Their design utilizes inventive approaches and technologies that seek to integrate and restore the natural environment rather than just addressing the building design itself. This course provides an introduction to the concepts and principles of living, regenerative, and adaptive design and helps the learner differentiate between them. The course also offers strategies to consider incorporating into a project, including creating buildings that generate their own energy, recycle their own water, improve the environment and the quality of life for occupants, and adapt to changing weather or conditions. Examples demonstrate how these strategies have been effectively implemented in projects. Case studies offer inspiration and lessons learned from the process.
Format: CE Course Pages: 93 Score: 2
Planning for Sustainable Development Part 1
To effectively plan for and implement sustainable development requires a clear understanding of the organizing principles for meeting human development goals while sustaining the natural systems and resources of the environment. In Part I of this two-part series, an introduction to the principles and concepts of sustainable development and an overview of respected programs, initiatives, and resources to guide current projects are provided. The interrelationships between and integration of issues to plan for and resolve using the sustainable development process are presented with an emphasis on various models for effectiveness. Approaches to engaging and educating the development team and community on the value of sustainable development are also presented. In Part II, examples and case studies demonstrate how different sustainable development programs and strategies have been implemented in projects, and their rationale and effectiveness is discussed based on initial goals and outcomes. Author Information: Stephanie Vierra Publication Date: December 2, 2020 AIA Expiry Date: November 29, 2026
Format: CE Course Pages: 109 Score: 2
Planning for Sustainable Development Part 2: Case Studies
To effectively plan for and implement sustainable development requires a clear understanding of the organizing principles for meeting human development goals while sustaining the natural systems and resources of the environment. In Part I of this two-part series, an introduction to the principles and concepts of sustainable development and an overview of respected programs, initiatives, and resources to guide current projects are provided. The interrelationships between and integration of issues to plan for and resolve using the sustainable development process are presented with an emphasis on various models for effectiveness. Approaches to engaging and educating the development team and community on the value of sustainable development are also presented. In Part II, examples and case studies demonstrate how different sustainable development programs and strategies have been implemented in projects, and their rationale and effectiveness is discussed based on initial goals and outcomes.
Format: CE Course Pages: 70 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 4: Performance Metrics (Part B)
The primary purpose of “Performance Metrics for Sustainable Design” is to explore what building designers can do to reduce the impacts of building construction and operation on the environment. This CE course discusses specific metrics to evaluate the individual facets of design. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2023.
Format: CE Course Pages: 107 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 1: Green Building Standards and Certification Systems
This course provides an introduction to green building standards and certification systems in use around the world with an emphasis on differentiating between single-attribute and multiattribute programs. Following green building standards and certification system guidelines leads to buildings that are healthier for their occupants, have a lower impact on the environment, and protect public welfare. The development, benefits, and application of the certification and rating systems are also discussed in order to effectively select and apply the appropriate ones to a project. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 126 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 2: Integrated Design
The integrated design process is a key strategy in designing and constructing buildings that are healthier for occupants, have a lower impact on the environment, and protect public welfare. This course provides an introduction to the principles and application of integrated design to projects in order to achieve high performance. You will gain an understanding of how integrated design differs from traditional design and how important the role of the integrated design team is in the process. Case study examples demonstrate a wide range of approaches and outcomes using the integrated design process to address the goals of various types of projects. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2022.
Format: CE Course Pages: 89 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 3: Performance Metrics (Part A)
The primary purpose of “Performance Metrics for Sustainable Design” is to explore what building designers can do to reduce the impacts of building construction and operation on the environment. This CE course discusses specific metrics to evaluate the individual facets of design. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was reviewed in 2023 and no changes were made
Format: CE Course Pages: 107 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 5: Trends in the Profession, Performance, and Practice
This course provides an introduction to and overview of the advancements, trends, and predictions for the world of sustainable design, relying on studies, reports, and analyses from a variety of trusted sources. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 119 Score: 2
Sustainable Design Part 6: Economic Analyses
Sustainable design provides not only improved indoor environmental quality for building occupants and reduced environmental impact on the earth, but also financial benefits to building owners. However, the perception is that doing the right thing for the environment will cost more. This course focuses on the economic principles used to evaluate and deliver a more sustainable building solution. We will review evaluation of capital investments in equipment, system upgrades, and building maintenance and operations that support buildings with a reduced environmental impact. This course is part of a six-part series that presents practical guidelines for designing sustainable buildings. Each section can be taken as an individual course. This course was last revised in 2021.
Format: CE Course Pages: 112 Score: 2
Spotlighting Social and Environmental Attributes to Enhance Preliminary Design
This course explores and illuminates the design process, from orchestrating stakeholder participation to finalizing schematic designs. Building Design Refresher identifies and explains the core elements of the design of a safe and healthy building with a low environmental impact. At the same time, it suggests how to invoke the intangibles that make projects truly delightful and consequential. The course work is illustrated by three extensive case studies of buildings that achieved sustainable design goals while working with sensitive sites, urban design, local climate, and passive energy technologies.
Format: CE Course Pages: 128 Score: 2